Eng301 Assignment 2 2015 Songs

ENG 101 Writing 1

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring, Summer
Requisites: Placement determined by SAT and/or ACT score
Grading: Graded (A-F)

First semester of the General Education Writing Skills Requirement for students required to take both ENG 101 and ENG 201. Practice in developing essays with variable emphases on purpose, subject, audience, and persuasion; in constructing mature sentences and paragraphs; and in revising. Introduces documenting and writing from sources. Twenty-five pages of graded, revised writing, excluding first drafts, exercises, and quizzes. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 101 and ESL 407. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade other than W may repeat the course in the summer or winter; or only in the fall or spring semester with a petition to the College of Arts and Sciences Deans' Office.


View Schedule for ENG 101

ENG 193 Fundamentals of Journalism

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to journalism that uses Buffalo as a backdrop to finding news and topics for feature stories. Course includes practice in the basic techniques of journalism, including finding and producing a print and broadcast news story on deadline, thinking in relation to the screen, and packaging stories for the web and broadcast media. For example: A. Galarneau This course will teach you to think, act and write like a journalist. The course is a gateway into the Journalism Certificate program and will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing for print, broadcast and the web. We will cover essential reporting tools (researching, interviewing, observing) and learn to write hard news stories, short features, blogs, TV broadcasts and reported opinion pieces. You may even write the same story for three different mediums. By the end of the semester, you will be able to produce a news story on deadline for print or web and develop news feature ideas and report and write them competently. If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. In the classroom, in addition to lectures, presentations, discussions and assignment reviews, students will do writing exercises, lots of writing exercises. Outside the classroom, students will cover assignments in the city. To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times and Buffalo News every day.


View Schedule for ENG 193

ENG 201 Writing 2

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring, Summer
Pre-requisites: ENG 101 or placement determined by SAT and/or ACT score
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Practice in developing complex interpretations of human experience and values as represented in various media. Conceptualizing and conducting original research, culminating in a major research essay using both library and online materials.


View Schedule for ENG 201

ENG 202 Advanced Writing: Technical

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Specialized styles of writing including technical, academic, journalistic, and scientific writing. This course is designed to prepare you for the practical and technical activities you will encounter in the workplace or in other courses.


View Schedule for ENG 202

ENG 207 Introduction to Writing Poetry and Prose Fiction

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: Freshman And Sophomore Standing Only. Seats reserved for juniors and seniors (available upon request from English Undergraduate Office)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of the craft of writing poetry and fiction. Under consideration: issues of form, metrics, imagery, lyricism, narrative, voice, style, character, plot, and metaphor. Includes study of diverse writers and styles. Prerequisite for all subsequent creative writing courses. Basic techniques of poetry and fiction writing. For example: J. Bowen Vladimir Nabokov once reflected that ?a writer should have the precision of a poet and the imagination of a scientist.? This introductory course is designed for beginning writers who would like to take the first steps towards exploring the craft of poetry and fiction. Students will be introduced to the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of each genre. Throughout the semester, the class will also be presented with diverse readings to study and emulate in order to kindle your own imaginative strategies. No prior writing experience is necessary. We will study differing modes of narration (the benefits of using a 1st- or 3rd-person narrator, or how an unreliable narrator is useful in the creation of plot), character development ( ?round? and ?flat? characters), narrative voice (creating ?tone? and ?mood? through description and exposition), and ?minimal? and ?maximal? plot developments. In poetry, we will consider the differences between closed and open forms, the use of sound and rhythm, and uses of figurative language and imagery. We will also study prosody and the practice of the line. Assigned exercises will give you the space to experiment with unfamiliar forms. Students are also invited to meet visiting poets and fiction writers at Poetics Plus and Exhibit X readings on campus and in downtown Buffalo. It may come as no surprise that Nabokov also noted that he has ?rewritten?often several times?every word I have ever published.? This introductory course is designed to be the first step on the long journey of literary practice.


View Schedule for ENG 207

ENG 214 Top Ten Books

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

The top ten books recommended in an annual survey of the University at Buffalo faculty as reading without which no undergraduate should have finished her or his education. This course serves as a basic introduction to general education.


View Schedule for ENG 214

ENG 221 World Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Selected key texts of world literature in English or in translation. For example: Prof. W. Hakala, Romance Traditions in Asia This course introduces students to narratives of romance that span Asia?s wide variety of religious, literary, theatrical, and cinematic traditions. Rather than defining romance by what it contains, we will instead consider what romance as a genre does. Through this approach, it becomes possible to examine why certain narratives were compelling enough to be transmitted across and preserved within a diverse range of cultures and historical periods. ?Texts? include English translations of Sanskrit drama, Persian and Hindi Sufi mystical works, early Japanese and Chinese novels, recent Bollywood cinema, Korean television melodramas, and the worldwide Harlequin Romance phenomenon. For example: Prof. J. Holstun, Non- North American Fiction We?ll read a diverse group of novels and novellas from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia, including And the Rain My Drink, Han Suyin?s historical novel about the Malay Insurgency against British rule, and its defeat; The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis?s modernist autobiography of a dead man; and Hadji Murat, Lev Tolstoy?s short novel about a Muslim Chechen warlord.


View Schedule for ENG 221

ENG 223 Medieval Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to literary texts from a variety of medieval European traditions and genres. For example, Prof. J. Frakes, Medieval European Women?s Literature This course will explore the medieval European literature of women?primarily literature by women, but also some texts written by men about women or to a woman. The texts span the period from the early Middle Ages to the seventeenth century, including texts from French, German, Italian, Greek, Yiddish, and the ever present Latin [all in translation], illustrating the broad scope of genres of the time, including love poetry, epic, letters, dramas, theology, biography, and romantic-erotic fables. Among the functions of the course will be to redirect critical attention away from the [almost exclusively male] canon of medieval texts and toward texts written by women, so that some insight may be gained into problems of literary reception and production on the part of women, of the role of women in literate society, and their informing activities in religious movements, and to gain some perspective on the history of women?s literature in Europe as it is relevant to contemporary issues in gender studies.


View Schedule for ENG 223

ENG 225 Medieval English Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Literary and cultural studies of texts in Middle English and in translation. For example: Prof. R.P. Schiff: Pre-Modern British Literature This course will be a literary historical survey of medieval Britain, moving us from the Old English period (Beowulf and more) to the late-medieval era (featuring Chaucer?s Canterbury Tales). While our course readings will be restricted to texts in English (with some exceptions being works in the original Middle English), our exploration of the multilingual history of Britain will lead us to work with translations of texts from Old English (The Wanderer; The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle); Latin (Bede; Geoffrey of Monmouth); French (Marie de France; John de Mandeville); and Welsh (the Mabinogion). Our course will engage with key monuments of Arthurian literature (such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Malory); political poems and documents (Piers Plowman; rebel letters); works of female mysticism (Margery Kempe); a medieval play (Mankind); and more.


View Schedule for ENG 225

ENG 231 British Writers I

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Literature of Britain and Ireland, from the beginnings to the late eighteenth century. For example: Prof. R.P. Schiff, A History of British Literature, Beginnings to 1800 This course will involve a survey of works of literature from the medieval period to the close of the eighteenth century, proceeding from Britain?s Old English period to the Anglo-Norman, the Late Medieval, the Early Modern, and the Eighteenth Century periods. While we will address the permeability of these literary historical borderlines, we will also use them as a framework for situating works in their socio-cultural contexts. Our course will imagine a rather than the literary history, and the choices in authors and excerpts will cover a number of recurring issues, such as ethnic identity conflicts, gender conventions, social and economic crises, political subversion, sexuality and knowledge, and the poetics of power. We will explore Anglo-Saxon elegies and the epic Beowulf, Marie de France?s Lanval, explore Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and investigate works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Behn, Swift, and others. For example: Nicholas Hoffman, Virtue in Early British Literature This course surveys British authors from the first thousand years of British Literature, organized loosely around the rise and fall of notions of virtue (which could include holiness, right action, manliness, and uprightness) as an animating and imaginative force intimately connected with literary pursuits. The goal of this course is to achieve a better understanding of the material, cultural, religious, and political conditions of textual production among the major literary 'periods' associated with British Literature. Along the way, we will test a simple thesis: notions of virtue that animate literary works appear to peak during the Renaissance, only to suffer a precipitous decline. According to the historian and scholar Quentin Skinner, "the swaggering figure of the Renaissance gentleman continued to be held up as an ideal... at least until the end of sixteenth century," only to be "largely swept away" by the middle of the seventeenth century. In this course we will trace to development of notions of virtue from their theological underpinnings in Chaucer and other medieval works, to the retreat of virtue to imaginative literature in Sidney and Spenser, and transformation of virtue into a discourse of interest and preservation in Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Donne. We will finish by looking forward to the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, the emergence of secular humanism, and the rise of the individual.


View Schedule for ENG 231

ENG 232 British Writers II

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Literature of Britain and Ireland, from the late eighteenth century to the present. For example: Prof. R. Ablow, The Value of Literature At the beginning of the 19th century the poets William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge attempted to redefine literary value in terms of the ability of some people (poets) to communicate their feelings to other people (readers). In so doing, they began a new tradition of questioning the nature of literary value, the work of the writer, and the importance of reading literature. This course offers an introduction to the wide variety of ways in which British writers asked these questions in the 19th and 20th centuries ? and to the assumptions and concerns about society, the family, the nation, and modernity that informed and complicated the ways in which they answered them. For example: K. Fetter, Form, Genre, History We now know that nineteenth century England saw the publication of as many as, if not more than, 60,000 novels. The period we will be confronting is one in which history was in overdrive: the French Revolution, two major English Reform Bills, the Industrial Revolution, the breakdown of class structures and gender relations, the rise of Darwinian evolution, new theories of sociology, psychology, philosophy, and two world wars. However, beginning in the nineteenth century, we also have a proliferation of literature and literary genres: Romanticism, the historical novel, the Lake Poets, realism, the silver-fork novel, the Pre-Raphaelites, the sensation novel, the detective story, modernism, and postmodernism. This semester we will be turning to novels, poems, and criticism to investigate the intersections of literary genre, form, and history, as well as the complex web of relations between history, author, text, and reader that underlie our confrontations with the literary text. Why is Jane Austen considered to be the founder of the realist novel? How do the protagonists in her novels differ from those of Charles Dickens, or Virginia Woolf? What does poetry do according to Wordsworth? Tennyson? T.S. Eliot? What is a `sensation novel?? What accounts for the revolution in literary form during the first half of the twentieth century? And what role do you as reader/critic play at the intersection of all these competing possible areas of attention?


View Schedule for ENG 232

ENG 241 American Writers I

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Literature of the United States, from colonial contact to the Civil War. For example: Prof. K. Dauber, The New World and the Meaning of America This course will follow the trajectory of the literature as it works to come to terms with experience in the new world and as it broods over the meaning of being American, the truth-value of literature, and the opportunities and perils of democratic writing. Writers will include Benjamin Franklin (inventor of the "autobiography"), Cooper (inventor of the Western), Poe (inventor of the mystery story), Stowe (author of perhaps the most influential political novel every written), and such giants as Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville. For example: C. Coley, Democracy and the Individual From Tom Paine?s revolutionary call for ?Common Sense? to Emerson?s reformist principle of ?Self-Reliance,? American writers have long attempted to reconcile those democratic ideals that uphold the freedom of the community (such as equality, national security, national welfare) with those that provide the individual freedom from the community (civil rights, privacy laws, private property). This course will explore the early American literary tradition from the colonial period to the Civil War by studying those authors, texts, and literary genres that have most thoroughly examined this often-conflicting relation between the individual and the national community. By the end of the semester, you will have a good understanding of the major literary, political, and cultural debates that preoccupied the American literary tradition from the 17th to the mid-19th century, as well as how literature as a cultural practice helped to influence these debates, beginning with the Puritas and proceeding through Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, and Rebecca Harding Davis, among other authors. For example: A. Siehnel, The American Frontier Nationalistic narratives are common to our understanding of the United States, yet the birth and early growth of the nation hardly resulted in an increased unification among American communities. Instead, division was sustained in national practice up until the formal split of the union caused by the Montgomery Convention, just one hundred years after the American Revolution. Through reading early American letters and literature, this course surveys how constitutional differences might be linked by analyzing our understanding of settling and settled American landscapes. We will focus on how new experiences of America?s frontier are recorded by a variety of different people (including Euro-American, Native American, and enslaved American writers), and we will consider the ways in which ideas of frontier inspire fear or curiosity. Additionally, we will reflect on literary forms and genres, including the travel narrative, the slave narrative, the essay, the short story, the novel, and the poem.


View Schedule for ENG 241

ENG 242 American Writers II

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Literature of the United States, from Reconstruction to the present. For example: Prof. R. Daly, The American Novel Why read literature? What?s in it for us? How does it contribute to our ability to survive and thrive in the larger world that includes literature but is not limited to it. This course will explore 20th- and 21st-century American literature, particularly novels and short stories, by Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Pynchon, and Toni Morrison, among others. We shall explore how to read literature and life in detail and in context. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, ?Lost Cause? Narratives This course begins with lost cause narratives in modern American literature. Our first lost cause is Confederate and we have to go to Mississippi to find its classic utterance. What is the Confederate South? Does it still exist? The Outlaw Josie Wales is a masterpiece of post-Confederate lost cause narrative. We go twice to Wounded Knee in this course: the last glimmer of Lakota resistance is extinguished at this site. Its principal leaders, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, are both assassinated while in captivity. What relation does lost cause narrative have to captivity narrative? Next we read redemptive narratives from African American literature: Martin Luther King gives a black Southern Baptist version of our national anthem, ?My country tis of thee,? and Toni Morrison?s Beloved understands its tribute. We end on the upbeat with the jolt and jive of Spike Lee?s brilliant Do The Right Thing. For example: N. Mugavero, The Purpose of Literature This course will explore authors from the Realists to the Modernists, to the Postmodernists to the (always) unnameable present, reading poetry, novels, short stories and criticism, always with an eye toward deciphering not only the meaning of this thing we call ?literature?, but also bearing in mind the historical and sociocultural factors that carry literature from the past to the present and into the future. We will attempt to unearth from this vast period of literary innovation what exactly literature has to say about the world as it once was, as it is now, and even perhaps, how it might be. In addition to the ?big picture?, we will cover a number of more specific themes at work in the various texts we will be looking at throughout the semester?such as gender, race, sexuality, femininity, masculinity, tragedy, comedy, and irony, all of which works in this period are trying to understand, rethink, and in some cases transcend.


View Schedule for ENG 242

ENG 251 Short Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the study of what short fiction does, how it does it, and what it can do that no other literary genre can. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, ?Short Story as Cultural Artifact? This course will introduce you to the genre of short fiction. We will read a large number of authors from a wide variety of countries writing about an extraordinary array of different subjects. Throughout, our discussions will have a dual focus. We will be attentive to the formal characteristics of the short story, such as character development, plotting, and point of view, but we will also examine what these stories have to tell us about the cultures that produce them. By the end of the semester, I hope that we will all have a better understanding of what short fiction does, how it does it, and what it can do that no other literary genre can. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, Conversations in American Short Fiction This course begins with a Poe sequence, with ?nevermore? and immurement, then it turns to Melville?s ?Bartleby,? to that famous utterance: ?I?d prefer not to,? and another immurement. We then take a comedy break, looking at some Charlie Chaplin, W. C. Fields, Laurel and Hardy, Buster Keaton, and other short films from the Golden Age of American film comedy. The next writers are also in a conversation with each other and with similar issues: we will read Charles Chesnutt?s tales in relation to Joel Chandler Harris?s Uncle Remus tales, especially ?How Brer Rabbit met Tar Baby,? a `folk tale? we are still pondering. Then we read Charlotte Perkins Gilman?s appalling The Yellow Wallpaper. Have we met this woman before, in Chesnutt?s Uncle Julius stories? Another comedy break takes us to classic TV comedy from its Golden Age, Jackie Gleason, Lucille Ball. How do we get from the woman in the wallpaper to Lucy Ricardo?


View Schedule for ENG 251

ENG 252 Poetry

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the forms, language, and history of poetry and to methods of poetic interpretation. For example: Prof. M.Q. Ma, Anglophone Poetry: Form and Genre This course introduces students to the study of the formal and the generic features of lyric poetry in English as it develops through history. Among the issues we will study in this class are, for example, 1) what are the main types of meters (e.g., syllabic, accentual-syllabic); 2) what are the most popular metric lines (e.g., iambic pentameter) and how to scan them; 3) how to recognize particular forms (e.g., sonnet, blank verse) and genre (e.g., ballad, elegy); 4) how style changes from one historical period to another; 5) how poems are related to social, political, and cultural environments in which they are created and received; 6) how aesthetic judgments are made and how they change over time---about poets, poetics, poetry schools, poetic styles, and about poetry in general; 7) how language is used and understood as the medium. The goals of the class are, among others, to help students improve their language awareness, their ability to read poems with recognition, understanding, and appreciation, their awareness of the historical, social, cultural, and political contexts in which poems are written, and their communication skills through the study of a set of literary terms. For example: Prof. T. Dean, The Mechanics of Poetry William Carlos Williams said that poems are machines made out of words. This course introduces students to the mechanics of poetry: how poems are made, how they function, and how we talk about them at the college level. We will consider the full range of poetic forms in English from the sixteenth century to the present, focusing on how poems speak to other poems more than they speak to their authors? experience. For example: S. McCaffery, Poetry?s Function, Form, and Difference This course is designed to introduce students to the mechanics and forms of poetry: its four defined historic functions (to imitate, to teach, to express, to invent), its different partitions (genres) and how and why it differs from prose. We will consider a wide range of forms from the sixteenth century to the present and learn to analyze the structure of poems in detail. The range of texts will include, among others, the sonnet, ode, elegy, pastoral and the more recent examples of concrete and sound poetry. The goals of the class are, among others, to assist students improve their reading skills, engage in class dynamic, compare and analyze texts in both their formal and historical contexts, and develop their communication skills in both written and oral form.


View Schedule for ENG 252

ENG 253 Novel

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the study of the novel. For example: Prof. R. Mack: The Novel?s Evidence In Gary Shteyngart?s Super Sad True Love Story (2011), characters tell their stories through diary entries and a ?GlobalTeens? account (which has elements of email, instant messaging, and, of course, Facebook). The technology may be up to date, but it is no new thing for a novel to borrow from other, apparently nonfictional, forms of writing. In this course, we focus broadly on the history of the novel in Britain and America: How did this new form of writing emerge? How has it changed over the centuries? We?ll get a hold on these big questions by looking at the novel?s use of evidence and its ideas about truth. The earliest novels are concerned to help readers see that their fictional claims might be close to fact. Daniel Defoe?s Robinson Crusoe (1719) is made up in part of Crusoe?s journal; Samuel Richardson?s Pamela (1740) is told in a series of letters. We?ll look at how these early ideas of fact and fiction are transformed, as the novel is transformed, in the centuries that follow. How does the novel use evidence to tell the truth of inner lives? How does the novel present evidence of the supernatural? How does it incorporate history? For example: Rae Muhlstock, Definitions of the Novel Virginia Woolf defines the novel as ?the most pliable of all forms.? From its very beginnings, the novel has been a genre defined by change; in its very name is its ability to redefine itself, to reinvent itself in a new?in a novel?form. Rather than attempt a definition of ?the novel,? this course will seek to explore how it encompasses such flexibility and variety. We will begin the semester with excerpts from the two authors most commonly credited with the invention of the modern novel, then moving to to the popular 18th-century travel genre and the Victorian middle class realist transformation of the travel narrative?s sense of defamiliarization. The second half of the semester includes works that question the realist techniques in place before the 20th century. These texts will raise questions about narrators, narration, and reliability. We will explore the tension between high and low cultures in the modernist and postmodern movements, and discuss how these anxieties play out on the page. Readings may include works such as Daniel Defoe?s Robinson Crusoe, Jane Austen?s Northanger Abbey, and Henry James?s Turn of the Screw.


View Schedule for ENG 253

ENG 254 Science Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

A survey of some of the major moments in the evolution of science fiction, including writers like Clarke, Delany, Le Guin, and Verne and such movies as 2001: A Space Odyssey and Blade Runner. For example: S. Ruszczycky, Frankenstein and the Genre of Science Fiction Samuel Delany claims that to identify Frankenstein as the novel that started science fiction is a misguided attempt to apologize for its popularity outside the academy by giving it a classy, literary parent. Instead, Delany suggests, we should think less about heritage and more about what traits science fiction works have in common: Androids, aliens, and mutant hybrids may not have a mother, but they have each other. At the heart of the debate over Shelley?s novel lies the broader question of literary genres: that is, how and why do writers, readers, and scholars group literary works into different categories? Science fiction, as a genre, tends to reflect thematic concerns with the problems of belonging and community: that is, how and why do we draw the line between insider and outsider, friend and enemy, human and monster, and what are the social and political stakes of these categorizations? While the problem of community isn?t by any means unique to science fiction, authors find in the genre a repertoire of tropes and conventions capable of exploring such problems in ways unavailable to other literary types. Close attention to how authors make use of this repertoire will help us elaborate a critical description of science fiction as a genre. Our work will consist primarily of close, careful readings of a number of novels and short stories, but we will also spend some time investigating the historical and cultural contexts in which these works were produced. For example: Guy Witzel, Science Fiction in the 21st Century This course examines science fiction from its origins to the age of globalization. Since its beginnings, this dynamic genre has entertained us and challenged us with visions of the future, both utopian and terrifying. Today, a decade into the 21st century, many advances have come to pass that have made their vivid first appearances in the annals of science fiction. And yet it is also the case that our world has come to share traits with this genre that are not so favorable, aspects made famous in the nightmare futures of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, Philip K. Dick, and H.G. Wells, What, then, does science fiction have to offer us today? Through a variety of materials we shall discover a rich, socially engaged, and global genre that has shaped itself to accommodate our increasingly interconnected and imperiled planet.


View Schedule for ENG 254

ENG 256 Film

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduces the study of film. For example: Prof. A. Spiegel, Great Directors A study in authorship, the director as sole owner and proprietor of his material, using some of the world's great filmmakers as exam-ples: Ford, Hitchcock, Fellini, Kurosawa, and Welles. I plan for two films per director - one early, one late - to show developments in concept and style. We'll be looking at a handful of the greatest films ever made: The Seven Samurai, 8 1/2, Psycho, The Searchers, Citizen Kane, and more. In addition to the above, students will get a lot of practice in reading movies seriously (that is, closely); in writing about them; in translating images into words. For example: K. James, American and European Film History This course surveys the history of the motion picture, from its invention in the late 19th century to the present, with a focus on the development of the language of cinema over the course of the 20th century. As a result of this focus, while the course will be nominally international in scope, emphasis will be placed on American and European cinema, where much early innovation in film art occurred. And while we will primarily examine fiction film, we will also dip into documentary and experimental film, each of which genre has its own history of innovation?each from a number of angles: aesthetic (narrative form, theories of editing, genre), technological (the development of protable cameras, sound, color, digital technology), and social (the studio system, state-sponsored cinema, cinema on the margins of the industry, cinema and race/class/gender). Through a combination of screenings, critical readings, papers, and in-class discussion, we will improve our critical viewing skills and learn to ?think like filmmakers? as we engage with this quintessentially 20th-century art form.


View Schedule for ENG 256

ENG 258 Mysteries

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of a selection of the most important examples of mystery writing and of recent attempts to modernize the genre, with attention to how these novels and short stories provide miniature social histories of the periods in which they were written.? For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Mystery Novel as Cultural Artifact For decades, mystery novels have been dismissed as "potboilers," not worthy of serious critical attention. Whatever one may think of the literary merits of mysteries, there is no denying the fact that they have proved to be a remarkably resilient and diverse form of popular fiction. This course will survey a selection of both the most important examples of mystery writing and recent attempts to "update" the genre. Our focus will be on the narrative techniques used by these writers to create character, structure plot, and maintain suspense. We can tell a lot about a society from the way it discusses crime and punishment. Therefore, we will also study how these novels and short stories provide miniature social histories of the periods in which they were written.


View Schedule for ENG 258

ENG 259 Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the study of drama. For example: C. Pfahl, The Absurd What can a plague that turns people into rhinoceroses or a brothel that sells illusions tell us about what it means to be social beings? Are we all simply actors in a theater of life? This course will explore the development of the ?absurd? in dramatic literature, beginning in ancient Greece and ending in the late twentieth century. Along the way, we will encounter writers from England, Ireland, France, America, Italy, and Romania. The idea of the absurd arises in both ?comedic? and ?serious? plays, and many texts the difference between the two. We will also encounter a range of topics and themes, including revolution, romance, cross-dressing, illusion/appearance vs. reality, sexuality, carnival, and futile waiting. We will be engaging with these plays as written texts and as filmed performances or film adaptations. Students will be required to attend and review a live performance of their choosing. Finally, this class will provide an introduction to the basic elements of plays and dramatic conventions, and guidance in writing about drama. In addition to the plays, therefore, there will be some shorter supplementary critical and instructive readings. For example: R. Hatch, Dramatic Literature of the World This course offers an introduction to the world of dramatic literature, beginning in ancient Greece and finishing in the U.S. in 2001; along the way we will stop in Japan, France, Ireland, England, and Norway, studying a wide range of forms, among them tragedy, comedy, melodrama, and expressionism. We?ll encounter plays-within-plays and plays about performance; ?epic? plays and plays that appear to be about nothing at all. The basic fact that a play requires, at minimum, a group of readers reading together suggests that no other form of writing is better suited to the classroom than drama. Keeping in mind that drama is both a literary and performing art, we?ll study each play on our list both as a textual artifact and as a blueprint for action (a script), exploring the history of its performance and reception. We will discover echoes of this duality at work in each play we read, as a tension between the ?show-stopping? potential of images and the incessant movement of plot, which unfreezes and undermines the image. Each treats this tension differently; we?ll make it our business to discover what these differences mean for us.


View Schedule for ENG 259

ENG 263 Environmentalist Writings

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Environmentalist writing, from nineteenth-century texts like Thoreau?s Walden through contemporary essays, fiction, and poetry. For example: Prof. C. Mardorossian, Ecocriticism What counts as the environment has radically changed over the last few decades. Whereas once our urban contexts were seen as antithetical to natural environments, today the urban environment constitutes one of the most studied aspects of environmental literature. In this course, we will look at the ways in which this development has affected ecocriticism, that is, ?the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment.? We will be using the Green Studies Reader to review the various approaches that have defined environmental literature since the Romantics (from nature writing to service ecology, from deep ecology to cyborg theory) and discuss the legacies of the 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth. In addition, we will read literary narratives in light of each approach promoted by the nonfiction writings we survey. For example: M. Konkol, Ecopoetics and Econarratology In this course we will, as Olson hoped, ?discover ourselves? as members of a global transnational biotic community. We will do this by reading poems, narratives, philosophical and scientific tracts. By alternating our reading between more conventionally recognized ?ecocritical? texts and material which is typically considered far removed from environmental concerns (experimental poetry and metropolitan postmodern fiction), we will arrive at compelling claims for literature?s role in plotting an ecologically sustainable future. Among the questions we will ask are: is art a form of recycling? What is natural and what is artificial? How do different narrative strategies make possible different attitudes towards the environment? How do we or might we read literature ecologically? Are there ways of reading which are, at some level, more in tune with ecology and the environment than other ways? This course will progress thematically but we will be mindful of our own pivotal historical moment as the culmination of a long history of differing attitudes toward the environment.


View Schedule for ENG 263

ENG 264 Children's Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of selected texts from the vast variety that comprises children?s literature, ranging from seventeenth-century fairy tales to contemporary children?s fiction. Trains students to analyze and write about the relationship between literary texts and the culture within which these texts are produced. For example: S. Brockman, Homecoming in Children?s Literature During a whirlwind adventure that begins in a cyclone and takes her all the way through Oz, Dorothy realizes that ?There?s no place like home.? When he learns that he?s a wizard, Harry Potter and finds his true home at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Many classic and contemporary works of children?s literature revolve around themes of escape and homecoming. In this course, we?ll think about why children?s literature lends itself so well to these and other important literary themes, drawing us in, often with more intensity than other sorts of literature. Above all, we?ll consider works of children?s literature as literature. In addition to doing close readings of various texts, we will consider them within their specific historical contexts and changing social climates. Texts for this course will cross centuries and continents and include multiple genres, with an emphasis on prose fiction and film adaptations. For example: Prof. L. Bendict, Sexuality, Pedagogy, and Censorship in Children?s Literature In 2007, Susan Patron?s The Higher Power of Lucky won the Newberry Medal. This uplifting little story might have happily existed on children?s library shelves across the US had the award not led to its acclaim, and therefore heightened scrutiny. Instead, the extra attention it received raised a moral hue and cry due to the appearance of the word ?scrotum? on the first page of the book. The reaction to Patron?s work raises many questions about the pedagogical aspect of children?s literature: if a book for children has the responsibility to teach, then where do we place the limit to knowledge? In this course, we will examine the tenuous line between childhood and adulthood by way of a broad survey of children?s literature, paying close attention to the relationships between pedagogy, morality, gender, and sexuality. This course will start in the 18th century with instructive stories for young people, proceed to the 19th-century mathematical fiction written to distract young boys from ?self-abuse,? and end in the 20th century, where the new genre of young adult fiction describes the child?s traumatic passage into adulthood. Along the way we will analyze the changing definitions of ?child,? including the kinds of knowledge children should or should not have, and the types of experience they should or should not be allowed to access.


View Schedule for ENG 264

ENG 268 Irish Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to Irish writing and culture. For example: Prof. D. Keane, The People of Ireland This course introduces the study of Irish literature in the twentieth century, focusing on constructions of notions of ?the people.? Beginning with the writing of the Literary Revival, we will track how changes in Irish society were both complicated and simplified by literary figures. As a unified and unitary sense of the ?Irish people? was argued about and, at times, fought over in the political sphere, how did writers add their voices to these debates? How did they respond to the challenges posed by women?s suffrage and feminism; the dwindling and impoverished population of Irish speakers on the island; differentiating the Irish from their British neighbors; migrations to urban centers in a predominantly agricultural and rural society; high rates of emigration; an island partitioned into a twenty-six county south and a six-county north; and the bitter legacy of Ireland?s struggles for self-determination? To attend to these questions, we will examine the public transmission of information, whether as representations of rumor, gossip, or chatter; the production of literary texts as politically-motivated and even propagandistic statements meant to spur debate and change public opinion; and the reception of such works in troubled and frequently violent contexts. For example: Ronan Crowley, 20th Century Irish Literature This course offers an introduction to the literature of twentieth century Ireland. We will explore a range of narrative forms ? short stories, poetry, drama, and the novel ? in the context of Irish history and culture and range as far as the newspaper column, a format not usually associated with the literary. Early in the semester we will read key literary figures including William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, George Moore, and Sean O?Casey. Turning to such post-independence writers as Elizabeth Bowen and Una Troy, subsequent readings will be drawn from the writings for page, stage and newspaper of Samuel Beckett, John Montagues, Patrick McCabe, and Brian O?Nolan.


View Schedule for ENG 268

ENG 270 Asian American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to selected Asian American literary texts and the cultural, historical, and political issues that inform them. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, Diversity of Asian America This course provides a general introduction to Asian American literature. ?Asian America,? as a pan-ethnic coalition born in response to racism and Orientalism, has been the site of tremendous literary production. The texts we will explore represent issues as diverse as the Japanese American internment during World War II; the traumatic legacy of colonialism for Korean Americans; the ironies marking the young lives of Vietnamese refugees from ?Operation Babylift? and Cambodian refugees resettled in the United States; the historical effects of migrant labor and colonialism on Filipino Americans; and the tensions around assimilation for those of Chinese and South Asian descent. Contemporary anxieties of race, gender, and sexuality will come to the fore in the work of a graphic novel. We will ask how Asian American writers respond to the politics of race and American imaginings of Asia, and how the literary texts register this response in terms of genre, narrative structure, character construction, and style.


View Schedule for ENG 270

ENG 271 African American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the study of African American Literature, with focus on major writers such as Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison. For example: Prof. H. Young, Contemporary African American Literature and Culture This class introduces students to contemporary African American literature, looking at the diversity of literary production that falls under the category of ?black.? What does it mean to be black and how does the literature we read explode any preconceptions we might have about its various meanings in different locations and time periods? Attention will be paid to topics such as immigration, sexuality, gender and slavery. In addition to novels and graphic novels, the class will include critical analyses of popular culture such as hip-hop, music videos and blogs. Many of the topics can become controversial but the classroom will be a safe place to work through some of the messiness of race and gender. For example: D. Squires, The Black American Autobiography Perhaps the most vital genre in black American literature, autobiography has been central to understanding the development of American history and African American autobiography is central to this understanding. Key historical figures such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson offered personal accounts of America?s foundation. Instead of starting with the founding fathers, however, we?ll begin in the cotton field on a journey that will take us all the way to the White House. Starting with texts written by former slaves (Douglass, Jacobs, Wells), this course will explore American life before and after the Civil War, and into the 20th century. Ida B. Wells and Richard Wright provide formidable accounts of segregated America. We will then turn to stories about civil rights movements and the struggle to desegregate the U.S. (Haley, Moody, Angelou). We?ll tackle questions about sex in the aftermath of the rights movements with Audre Lorde and we?ll ask what exactly Barack Obama, and America more generally, has inherited from this exemplary tradition of American autobiography.


View Schedule for ENG 271

ENG 272 US Latino/a Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the variety of cultural works produced by U.S. Latino/a writers and artists, from poetry and plays to novels and films. For example: Prof. C. Tirado-Bramen, Latino and Latina Cultural Expression From poetry and performance art to novels and short stories, this course will provide an overview of cultural works produced by U.S. Latino and Latina writers and artists. We will begin with a historical perspective and the importance of the Mexican American War of 1848 and the Spanish American War of 1898 in forging a U.S. Latino presence in the United States, then turn turn to early twentieth-century immigrant journalists, such as Bernardo Vega and Jes?s Col?n, viewing their early works alongside Mexican corridos (ballads) from Texas. We will then explore the 1950s, comparing the zoot suit poetry of Ra?l Salinas with Piri Thomas?s Nuyorican novel Down These Mean Streets. We will read sidely in the Nuyorican and Chicano Renaissance of the late 1960s and 1970s, examining the nationalist ideologies of Aztl?n and Boricua and the early critiques of Latina feminists. We?ll then turn to the rise of a pan-Latino identity in the 1980s and 1990s. There will be a slide show of contemporary mural art, a screening of performance pieces by Coco Fusco as well as the movie ?El Norte.?


View Schedule for ENG 272

ENG 273 Women Writers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to literature written by women, with focus on historical and cultural context of women?s lives. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, America and Americanness in Women?s Literature This course will provide an introduction to the study of literature by women and to the significance of gender in literary analysis. In our readings, we will consider themes that often resurface in women?s literature, such as body image, women?s work and constructions of domesticity, reproduction and motherhood, women?s culture, and issues of agency and voice. Is there a particular aesthetic associated with femininity? How does gender intersect with other forms of difference (racial, sexual, class-based)? Do the differences among women allow for connection or solidarity, both in terms of feminist politics and in terms of literary critique? How have women?s social, political, and economic positions affected literary production? How has women?s literature enacted social and political critique? In what ways has women?s literature re-envisioned history? How have women drawn upon and yet revised cultural traditions? What is the relationship between women?s literature and the literary canon? Focus will be on American women?s literature, particularly texts that engage ideas of Americanness. For example: H. Recny, A Literature of One?s Own How does women?s writing distinguish itself from its male counterparts? Are there common themes that appear in writing by women? Can they be ?universal?? How do women represent (other) women? How have women writers and the characters that they represent grappled with the exclusions and inequalities among women? How are you connected to women in the United Kingdom, Antigua, India, and Zimbabwe? This course focuses on how gender influences the writing of a particular time and place. Using canonical and non-canonical texts, we will explore how non-western women writers from the colonies and newly independent nations represent women and identities that do not fit traditional categories of gender, race, and nation. We will engage in debates about the literary canon, language ownership, the usefulness of gender as basis for a literary genre and community, and the function of writing as part of a global exchange.


View Schedule for ENG 273

ENG 274 Feminist Approaches to Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the study of feminist theory and its applications to literary texts.


View Schedule for ENG 274

ENG 276 Literature and the Law

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Examination of works of literature that revolve around representations of the relationships between law, community, religion, and the state, with attention to the relationship between legal interpretation and textual analysis. For example: Morani Kornberg-Weiss, Language and the Law In the study and practice of law, truth and justice rely on narration. Words, after all, are essential for lawyers, defendants, and juries. Rhetoric and argumentation help one make a ?case.? This course invites students to explore the nature of law, ethics, and social justice through the prism of literature and language. We will consider the modes in which law and literature intersect and think about the function of narrative and storytelling, form and sequence, punishment, interpretation, ethics, and political and social order. Beginning with the question ?What is truth?? we will examine its ramifications in various cultural, social, and historical moments. Texts are often ambiguous and contradictory, holding multiple truths and meanings. They change as readers change. These paradoxes will motivate us to ask: in what way is law similar to literature? How does each discipline define a ?text?? How does each define ?justice?? How does literature employ narrative as a form of regulation? How does the way in which a story is told affect what it means? Although most of the texts we will read clearly foreground the function of law and punishment, others engage us through a seemingly absent legal system.


View Schedule for ENG 276

ENG 278 Best Sellers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Examination of the phenomenon of the best seller in the past and present.


View Schedule for ENG 278

ENG 281 Special Topics

Lecture
Credits: 1-3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Intro Pop Culture Despite the fact that popular culture plays a large part in the vast majority of ordinary people?s lives, its serious study is still a relatively recent phenomenon in the academy, which has tended to dismiss pop culture as nothing more than mindless, frivolous, even pernicious entertainment. This class will explore why pop culture matters by introducing students to the basic theories and approaches to the scholarly study of popular culture, concentrating in particular on how pop culture helps to create and reflect the zeitgeist of the periods in which it emerges and evolves. We will accomplish these goals by focusing on the theme of violence in American popular culture. From the Puritan period to the present day, Americans have always documented their intense interest in violence through popular culture and we will investigate the history of and reasons for this interest by studying examples taken from a wide variety of genres and subjects. Along the way, we will discuss the distinction between folk, mass, and popular culture; changing definitions of criminality and deviance; manifest destiny; urbanization; the influence of evolving media technologies, and the rise of a celebrity culture organized around criminals, with a primary emphasis on how popular culture gives us insights into the societies of which it is an integral part. This class will be taught in a large lecture format, with small seminar groups each Friday to discuss particular texts. For example: J. Bodway, The Gothic From the success of survival horror video games (Resident Evil, Silent Hill, etc.), to the continued popularity of horror films (Halloween, Saw, etc.), it is not a stretch to say that horror is a business, and its business is good. As a business, horror is an emotion that is manufactured by the images that we see and by the stories that we read. However, these images and stories have a history, and this course will examine how this history has come to shape our understanding. Our investigation will begin with a study of the gothic novel as it emerges at the end of the eighteenth century, then move into the many gothic themes of British and American Romanticism. Gothic literature often blurs the distinction between the physical and the psychological. In addition to our readings, we will examine paintings by such artists as Henry Fuseli, Francisco de Goya, and Gustave Dor?. We will end the semester with a screening of Stanley Kubricks rendition of The Shining; a tour de force of gothic cinema.


View Schedule for ENG 281

ENG 301 Criticism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring, Summer
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the craft of literary criticism, including techniques of close reading, two or more sorts of literary theory, and strategies for writing and revising critical papers. For example: Prof. S. Hubbard, Approaches to Literature and Culture What is literature (as opposed to all the other written material that?s out there)? What does it mean to ?close read? it? To ?interpret? it? To ?deconstruct? it? Why is one reading of a novel or a poem more persuasive, more useful, more influential than another? How can your own writing about literature plug into some of the insights and lines of inquiry that professional theorists and critics have developed? What do your professors really want when they ask you to make ?an original? argument about a literary text? In this course, you?ll discover the answers to these questions and many more. English 301 provides students of literature with an introduction to the varieties of literary and cultural criticism and the techniques and strategies required to research and write effective critical essays (the course is not, however, a general introductory survey of literature). We will discuss a number of key theoretical concepts and approaches to the analysis of literature (New Critical, poststructuralist, historicist, reader-response, feminist, psychoanalytic, Marxist, eco-critical, queer, race theory, etc.) and will read some ?classic? works of criticism and theory that have helped to shape the field. We will also consider the strategies of analysis appropriate to different genres as well as practicing methods of rhetorical and historical reading and textual analysis. For example: Prof. J. Holstun, Literary Theory and Edgar Allan Poe This course will introduce the craft of literary criticism, moving from high falutin? psychoanalytical and literary theory, to meat-and-potatoes close reading, to nuts-and-bolts research methods and revision techniques. With focus on the poetry, fiction, and critical prose of Edgar Allan Poe, we will read a wide variety of literary criticism, including formalist studies of Poe?s craftsmanship, psychoanalytical studies of the unconscious and literary form, and cultural and Marxist studies of Poe, race, and capitalism. We?ll read three Poe-esque novellas: E. T. A. Hoffmann?s ?The Sandman,? Herman Melville?s ?Benito Cereno? (about slave rebellions and white hysteria), and Charlotte Perkins Gilman?s ?The Yellow Wallpaper? (about patriarchal enclosure and domestic madness), and Freud?s ?The Uncanny? and Beyond the Pleasure Principle as ways to understand Poe?s literary effects. And we?ll talk about paper development, manuscript form, research methods (finding works online and on the shelves), using biographical and socio-cultural material creatively, and prose revision.


View Schedule for ENG 301

ENG 302 Old English

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Anglo-Saxon England. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Learning Old English Old English often has a bad reputation, as if the course itself were as dark and ghoulish as the monsters that Beowulf had to fight. Well, it doesn?t have to be like that. The bottom line is that, while Old English does require some work, it?s possible to learn and can even be quite a bit of fun, because there is a great deal of interesting material in Old English that you won?t find anywhere else and that has nothing to do with sword and ogres and dragons (though there is some of that). By consciously recognizing what you already know about English, Old English can open up a new culture to you rather than being a ?foreign language.? In this course we will spend some time on a guided review of what you already know about English so you can apply that to thousand-year old texts. Then we?ll be ready for reading Old English texts: about daily life, magic, religious practices, gender roles, burial customs, tenth-century ladies? fashions, shipwrecks, and so on.


View Schedule for ENG 302

ENG 303 Chaucer

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of works by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, the dream visions, and / or Troilus and Criseyde. For example: Prof. R. Schiff, The Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer has often been called the Father of English poetry, and indeed his work has profoundly influenced both the literary canon and the very language itself. In our course we will explore the texts and contexts of Chaucer?s most seminal project, The Canterbury Tales. Besides reading Chaucer?s poetry in the original Middle English, we will also familiarize ourselves with late-medieval culture by exploring related primary and secondary texts.


View Schedule for ENG 303

ENG 304 Studies in Medieval Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

The content of this course is variable. Study of Medieval literature in relation to historical and cultural phenomena, including multiple genres. A. Medieval Romance. B. Medieval Prose.. For example 304A: Prof. Randy Schiff, Arthurian Literature Throughout the Middle Ages, narratives related to the world of King Arthur proved to be among the most popular literary works. This course will consist of a survey of key texts of medieval Arthurian literature, reading works (often in translation) from the Latin, Old French, and Middle English traditions. In our survey of Arthurian literature, we will look closely at issues of power that are played out in these texts, while negotiating the differences between the ?chronicle? and ?romance? styles of Arthurian literature.


View Schedule for ENG 304

ENG 305 Medieval Epic

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of the social and cultural function of epic and the hero in medieval Europe. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Jewish Epic This course will examine the development of the Jewish Epic. In the late Middle Ages the literary genre of epic suddenly appeared in Jewish culture for the first time in its history, and it appeared in Yiddish, not Hebrew: both short heroic lays and lengthy epics, both secular tales adapted from Christian sources and religious tales derived from Jewish traditions of Bible and midrash. There are epicized versions of humorous tales of Abraham?s youth, pious meditations on core narratives of the Jewish faith (the Binding of Isaac), swashbuckling Jewish adventure heroes, King David as a quasi-medieval night, and a tale of international intellectual intrigue with a high priest, a pope, a Jewish king, a pious scholar, and a beautiful maiden.


View Schedule for ENG 305

ENG 306 Love in the Western World

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of the medieval literary origins of modern conceptions of romantic love. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Romantic Love in Western Literature Over the course of the last two-and-a-half millennia there have developed multiple traditions of romantic love in Western Asia and Europe. This course will investigate those traditions by means of a survey of both theoretical writings concerning love and literary works that themselves represent romantic love.


View Schedule for ENG 306

ENG 308 Early Modern Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

British drama from roughly 1450 to 1660, from late-medieval mystery and morality plays to the establishment of a professional theatre under Elizabeth I and its development through the Jacobean and Caroline periods. For example: Prof. B. Bono: The Illusion of Power Shakespeare?s plays were written in an age of theater that also produced a host of other major playwrights ? Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Webster-- and literally dozens of masterful plays. Theater under Elizabeth I and James I was both elite and popular. It was orthodox, conforming religious and political pieties, exorcising social discontent, and it was subversive, threatening traditional boundaries and articulating hitherto unspoken fears. It was performed in the centers of power ? the courts, grate houses, and banqueting halls of the mighty ? and it was marginalized, censored, played out in the suburbs, amid the stews and the bear baiting. In 1642 the public theater was suppressed, but in 1649 it arguably played out its ?last act? in a process Franco Moretti has been described as the ?deconsecration of sovereignty,? the literal execution of the King Charles I. This course will study these distinctions among and contradictions within the Elizabethan and Jacobean theater through an historical survey reaching back to the native origins of English drama and looking ahead to Charles? deposition. After sampling from the antecedent English mystery plays, moralities, and humanist experiments in drama, we will frame our study through the anti-theatrical debates of the period and focus upon approximately one play a week.


View Schedule for ENG 308

ENG 309 Shakespeare, Early Plays

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Primarily histories and comedies. For example: Prof. C. Mazzio, Drama of Errors This course will focus on Shakespeare?s comedies, histories, and select tragedies. While this course will serve as an introduction to Shakespeare?s early plays, introducing students to Shakespeare?s language, dramatic technique, and innovations as he moved from play to play, we will also examine some central issues that traverse many plays and genres, including, for example, the status of error in Shakespeare. For example: Prof. A. Stott, Theatricality of the Self, Nation, and Stage This course looks exclusively at the career of William Shakespeare from the very earliest work up to his greatest masterpiece, Hamlet. We?ll begin by considering the state of the London stage at the time of Shakespeare?s debut, the social and political conditions of England at the time, and the artistic and literary precursors that influenced his work. We?ll pay attention to three principle genres in which he worked at this time?comedy, tragedy, and history?and try to trace the development of some of his key themes: desire?s conflict with convention; freedom versus duty; history and the idea of nation; and various ruminations on the theme of theatricality, especially social convention as a type of theatre, and the representation of self as a kind of performance. For example: Prof. B. Bono, Authority and Romance This Fall Semester course on Shakespeare?s earlier works will begin with his self-conscious gestures of mastery in the virtually interchangeable romantic tragedy Romeo and Juliet (1594-96) and romantic comedy A Midsummer Night?s Dream (1594-96). During the course of the semester we will then go on to read selections from his second tetralogy of history plays?Richard II (1595), 1 Henry IV (1597), and Henry V (1598-99)?and his series of romantic comedies?Twelfth Night (1599-1600)?as complementary treatments of the fashioning of authority from without, through the recreation of a myth of divine kingship, and from within, through the reproductive consent of women.


View Schedule for ENG 309

ENG 310 Shakespeare, Late Plays

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Primarily tragedies and romances. For example: Prof. B. Bono, Political (Dis)Order This course typically begins with the Chorus?s fond hope at the beginning of Act V of Henry V that the triumphant Hal will enter London like a ?conqu?ring Caesar,? or ?As, by a lower but highloving likelihood, Were now the General of our gracious Empress?/ As in good time he may?from Ireland coming, /Bringing rebellion broached on his sword.? But there?s a problem. Essex, the ambitious courtier-knight who was ?the General of our gracious Empress? did not come home from Ireland like a ?conqu?ring Caesar,? ?Bring rebellion broached on his sword.? Instead he came home defeated, rebellious himself. In the late Elizabethan regime, the fragile balance that created celebratory history plays and resolved romantic comedies?the materials of English 309: Shakespeare?s Earlier Plays?collapses, so that, with Elizabeth?s death and James?s accession, we are left with frank examinations of how political order is often created out of irrational and self-interested acts of violence (Julius Caesar), leaving skepticism (Hamlet), surveillance (Measure for Measure), excoriating sexual jealousy and doubt (Othello), heated ambition (Macbeth), and the threat of total annihilation (Lear). In Shakespeare?s final plays, the problem of political authority reorganizes itself around greater and more various agency for women and anticipations of the new world order of the Americas. Origin, conflict , sex, murder, ambition, death, production, and reproduction will be our issues. For example: Prof. S. Eilenberg, The Wit of Paradox This course is devoted to a reading of Shakespeare?s later plays, including the mass of great tragedies (Hamlet, Lear, Othello, Macbeth) and a few of the romances (The Winter?s Tale, The Tempest). All his life Shakespeare has been interested in the space of impossibility made possible: it has been the space of playful wit, flaunted theatricality, amusing or outrageous paradox. As the playwright develops this space of paradox sheds its boundaries and grows ever more uncanny. The characters of the late tragedies and romances face what cannot be faced, bear what cannot be borne-- and as one character cries to another, ?Thy life?s a miracle,? we meditate upon the tragic lie he tells that is at the same time a tragic truth. It is this disbelieved fiction of goodness--born of madness and delusion and chicanery and revenge but intimating something else, pointing mysteriously toward what King Lear calls the ?chance which does redeem all sorrows / That ever I have felt,? upon which the tragedies brood. It is this fiction too upon which the romances build their fictions of that which lies on the other side of loss, out beyond grief--not resurrection, perhaps, but that which may be just as welcome. All this will be our matter.


View Schedule for ENG 310

ENG 311 Text and Image in Early Modern Culture

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Examination of the relationship between the visual arts and the written word in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including the impact of iconoclasm, printing and the book trade, continental influences, and classicism, together with the relationship between art and power.


View Schedule for ENG 311

ENG 312 Studies in Early Modern Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

The content of this course is variable. Selected topics in early modern British literature, such the literature of exploration, early modern gay and lesbian literature, literature at court, literature of religious controversy, the English Revolution, or single authors like Christopher Marlowe.


View Schedule for ENG 312

ENG 313 Sixteenth-Century Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Mostly non-dramatic literature from authors such as More, Medwall, Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey, Spenser, Philip Sidney, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Nashe, Elizabeth I, and Mary Sidney.


View Schedule for ENG 313

ENG 314 Seventeenth-Century Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Mostly non-dramatic literature from authors such as Donne, Lanyer, Jonson, Bacon, Marvell, Milton, Hobbes, Bunyan, Behn, Dryden, and the radical writers of the English Revolution. For example: S. Stevens, 17th Century Poetry and Prose This course will examine a wide variety of seventeenth-century poetry and prose. We will study such major authors as Ben Jonson, John Donne, and George Herbert as well as a number of less familiar Metaphysical and Cavalier poets. Among prose writers we will look at the important development in cultural history and prose styles represented by Francis Bacon, Thomas Browne, John Bunyan and others. All works will be read with attention to their culture and historical contexts. Issues such as the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, sexuality and gender, and the rise of science will be among the topics addressed in this course.


View Schedule for ENG 314

ENG 315 Milton

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Study of Milton?s Paradise Lost and other works in social and literary context. For example: Prof. S. Eilenberg, Poetry of Excess This course will be devoted to the study of John Milton, devoted student of power relations, a poet whose imaginative audacity and intellectual power have inspired three centuries of poets and other readers with wonder and chagrin. Milton is the premier poet of excess, a too-muchness that works, paradoxically, to convert plenitude into poverty and to subvert the possibility of measurement and comparison that reason requires. This subversion?the confusion between too much and too little--will be our theme as it was Milton?s. We shall read his major poetry and a little of his prose: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Areopagitica, as well as such slighter works as Comus and ?On the Morning of Christ?s Nativity.? For relief from sublimity--and in order to remember the stories that nourished the poems?we shall also be reading Ovid?s Metamorphoses. For example: Prof. Graham Hammill, Milton?s Poetic Development This course will focus on the poetry and prose of John Milton, one of the most compelling and important poets in all of English literature. The first half of the semester, we will read Milton?s early experimental poetry, his youthful efforts to redefine various Classical and Renaissance forms of poetry and drama, as well as some of his political prose. The second half of the semester, we will read Milton?s major poems, Paradise Lost, Paradise Re-gained, and Samson Agonistes. Throughout, we will pay close attention to Milton?s ambitions to become England?s greatest poet, the role of gender and sexuality in his poetry and prose, the intimate connection in his writings between religion and revolution, and his on-going attempt to define and assert liberty.


View Schedule for ENG 315

ENG 316 Early Women Writers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Medieval Works by European women such as Hrotsvit, Heloise, Marie de France, Moderata Fonte, Veronica Franco, Justine Siegemund, and Glueckel of Hameln. B. Renaissance Works by such sixteenth- and seventeenth-century women writers as Wroth, Lanyer, Carey, Speght, Sowerman, Sidney, Cavendish, Bradstreet, Astell, and Phillips. C. Restoration and Eighteenth Century Works by writers such as Behn, Burney, Haywood, Lennox, Montague, Wollstonecraft. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Women Writers of Medieval and Early Modern Venice Medieval and early modern Venice was a terribly exciting place economically, politically, and culturally. It had earlier been home to Marco Polo and was during the early modern period home to the composers Vivaldi and Monteverdi, the painter Titian, the architect Palladio, and to one of the most vibrant and intellectually productive Jewish communities in history. It was the international marketplace of Europe, importing goods from as far away as Japan, and controlling seaways of the entire eastern Mediterranean. Venice was also home to one of the earliest broad-ranging bodies of women?s literature in history. That literature is often overtly (proto-) feminist and just as often rivals and quality the interest produced by Renaissance men.


View Schedule for ENG 316

ENG 317 British Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Selected topics in British drama from the Restoration period through the present. A. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama Drama from the period 1660 to 1800, including works by authors such as Behn, Congreve, Wycherley, Sheridan, Otway and Etheridge. B. Romantic Drama Drama from the period 1770 to 1830, including works by writers such as Baillie, Lewis, Inchbald, Shelley, Byron, Cowley, Coleman, Dibdin, and Kemble. C. Nineteenth-Century British Drama Drama from the period 1800 to 1914, including works by authors such as Wilde, Pinero, Shaw, Granville-Barker, Ibsen, Thomas and others. For example: Prof. D. Alff, Restoration Drama London?s playhouses had been shuttered for eighteen years when Charles II lifted the Puritan ban on public stage performance. His 1660 order to re-open the theaters triggered an outpouring of new and adapted plays from the likes of John Dryden, William Wycherley, Aphra Behn, and many others, while re-authorizing modes of cultural commentary and political expression that had been driven underground during the Interregnum. This course will familiarize students with British drama written between 1660 and 1730. We will read one play per week, giving special attention to how the London stage became a space for raising problems of class, gender, race, and national difference. Signature thematic interests of this period included differing conceptions of sex, marriage, and domesticity, the corruption of state leaders, the expansion of overseas empire, and the growing popularity of the city and its mercantile values. Our analysis will also take into the account how drama itself was changing in this period, including, most notably, the debut of women on stage. In addition to the primary literature, students will read brief excerpted works of modern performance theory to consider what experiences and knowledge our text-based ?reading? of drama might exclude.


View Schedule for ENG 317

ENG 318 Eighteenth-Century Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

Fiction prior to and including the first British novels; authors may include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Frances Burney. For example: Prof. D. Alff, Popular Fiction of 18th Century Britain Cunning deceit. Dissimulating pretense. Imaginative invention. These are just a few eighteenth-century definitions for fiction, a term we today associate with prose stories. This course will investigate a broad range of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English-language fictions, challenging students to refine their understanding of this popular mode of literary expression. For example: Prof. R. Mack, Origins of the English Novel This course examines how the English novel came into being. Although we now call their texts ?novels,? many of the authors we will read in this course would have considered that an insult, and instead called their books ?histories,? ?stories,? and even ?comic epic-poems in prose.? How did this motley group of texts come to be understood as evidence of the same novel, or new, thing? What did it mean to call a fictional text a ?history?? How did what Henry Fielding referred to as a new ?Species of Writing? attempt to make itself respectable? We will examine the battles waged between this new writing and the generic adversaries it created, such as poetry, the newspaper, and the romance. We will discuss the novel?s relationship to society, both as early writers saw it and as it has been understood since.


View Schedule for ENG 318

ENG 319 Eighteenth Century Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)

ENG301 Assignment No 3 Fall 2017

Dear Students, Here you can read or Download ENG301 - Business CommunicationAssignment No 3 Solution and Discussion of Semester Fall 2017. Assignment Due Date is 02 February, 2018. Total Marks are 20. Lectures covered in this Assignment are from Lecture No 23 to Lecture No 37. ENG301 Assignment Solution File has been added. We are here to facilitate your learning and we do not appreciate the idea of copying or replicating solutions.

ENG301 Assignment No 2 Solution and discussion Fall 2017

ENG301 Assignment Instructions:

  • Upload your assignments in a proper format, i.e. MS word file. Corrupt files will be awarded zero marks.
  • The assignments should be zoomed in at 100%.
  • Please avoid plagiarism; plagiarized work will be marked zero.
  • After the due date, the assignments submitted via email would not be entertained.
  • Please avoid submitting copied assignments; otherwise, such a case would be referred to the discipline committee.
  • The font color should be preferably black and font size 12 Times New Roman.
Recommended : ENG301 All Past Papers of Fall 2015

ENG301 Assignment Question No 1:

As the Sales Director of Sapphire & Co., write a circular letter to introduce your new Allama Iqbal Town branch to your customers.

ENG301 Assignment Question No 2:

Match the special terms for meetings in column A with their definitions in column B and write the correct definitions in column C.


Special terms for Meetings and Committee :

ENG301 Assignment Question No 2 - Special terms for Meetings and Committee 

ENG301 Assignment No 3 Solution Fall 2017

You can see the Sample Preview of ENG301 Assignment No 3 Solution provided by (Virtual Study Solutions) below. Click on Download Button to Download Solution File in Your PC. Please Share it with your friends. You can also like our Facebook Page or Subscribe Us below for Updates.


ENG301 Assignment Solution Sample Preview

ENG301 Assignment No 3 Solution Fall 2017 Sample Preview
Assignments Solutions Fall 2017:

ENG301 Assignment Solution Download Link

Download

0 Thoughts to “Eng301 Assignment 2 2015 Songs

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrĂ  pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *