Example Essays On Death Of A Salesman

Death of a Salesman raises many issues, not only of artistic form but also of thematic content. Dramatically speaking, the play represents Arthur Miller’s desire to modernize the tragedy of Aristotle described in the Poetics. Aristotle held that tragedy portrayed the downfall of a king or noble, whose fall from grace was the result of a tragic flaw—generally held to be hubris, or an excessive amount of pride. Miller, on the other hand, believes that tragedy—or the individual’s desire to realize his or her destiny—is not solely the province of royalty. It also belongs to the common man—in this case the “low man,” as in Willy Loman.

Willy’s tragic flaw stems from the fact that he has misinterpreted the American Dream, the belief that one can rise from rags to riches. For Willy, the success of that dream hinges on appearance rather than on substance, on wearing a white collar rather than a blue one. It is this snobbery, combined with a lack of practical knowledge, that leads to his downfall.

Indeed, much of the lasting popularity of Death of a Salesman both in the world of the theater and in the canon of English literature, lies in its treatment of multiple themes. Too didactic or moralistic for some modern readers, who see the author as heavy-handed, the play nevertheless raises many pertinent questions regarding American culture. Many younger readers have even credited it with preventing them from making the same mistakes committed by the characters.

Chief among these themes is an indictment of the capitalist nature of the American Dream—the belief that through the pioneer virtues of hard work, perseverance, ingenuity, and fortitude, one might find happiness through wealth. Implicit within this dream, however, is the assumption that money leads to fulfillment, regardless of the type of work that one does in order to attain it. While Willy himself was never successful as a salesman, he remains confident that his son Biff will be able to make it big in business because of his good looks and his past glory as a high school football star. Willy makes the error of celebrating popularity over know-how, style over substance. He taught Biff that being “well-liked” would carry the day, thus ignoring the damaging truth that Biff’s habit of petty theft—whether it was lumber from a nearby construction site or a football from the locker room—would ultimately lead to the boy’s downfall.

The way in which this theme informs the play is also the key to its form, since Willy constantly relives the past through a series of flashbacks. These scenes present Biff and Happy as they appeared in high school, providing the audience with a glimpse into the happy past that shaped the unhappy present. Another theme thus emerges: that the decisions made in youth have a direct impact on one’s life in maturity. In addition, by seeing past events, the audience is forced to admit that Willy lives in a world of fantasy and denial, where he is unwilling to confront his own role in contributing to his son’s unhappiness.

Indeed, the linchpin of the play surrounds an event in Willy’s past, when Biff discovered his father committing an infidelity with another woman. Crushed by his newfound glimpse into the world of adults, the adolescent Biff learned that his larger-than-life father was all too human, that he was “flawed.” Thrust abruptly from the world of innocence into the world of experience, Biff sabotaged his own life by refusing to attend summer school, thus preventing him from making something of himself at the university. Instead, he took a series of menial jobs and wandered aimlessly, only to return home at the age of thirty-four, unsure of both his identity and his purpose.

The play returns, then, to its examination of the American Dream, asking such fundamental questions as “What is the nature of success, and how does one attain it?” For Willy, it means wearing a suit and tie and making a lot of money—in short, it means having pride, or hubris. Yet, when Biff confronts his father in the final scene, he has an epiphany, a sudden burst of knowledge: Biff realizes that success entails working at an enjoyable job, which for him means working on a farm, outdoors, with his shirt off. The life of business and the city is not for him, and he sees his happiness in day-to-day living rather than in the goals foisted on him by society or by his father. Happy, meanwhile, lacks the courage of honesty and remains caught in the rat race, still under the impression that wealth and status are the keys to fulfillment. In a sense, Death of a Salesman ends on an optimistic note, in that Biff discovers a new sense of himself, stripped of illusion, as he finally becomes a man with self-respect—one who paradoxically has found pride through humility.

Willy, however, remains imprisoned by a set of false ideals. Having devoted his life to a belief in the honor of a career as a salesman, he possessed too much snobbery to admit that his own destiny was in a simple career as a carpenter. Instead, he listened to his brother Ben, that figment of his imagination who told him that money was the true path to happiness. Out of options, Willy decides that suicide is his only exit, since Biff will then collect the insurance settlement and be able to launch a career in business.

Yet, although he remains misguided, Willy achieves the stature of a tragic hero. Fighting a world pitted against him, he fulfills his destiny and sacrifices himself for his son by paying a debt in blood. The futility of his life and dreams are revealed, however, when only his immediate family attends what Willy has imagined would be a magnificent funeral, thus exposing a legacy of only disappointment and death.

Nevertheless, the end is not entirely bleak: Through his father’s sacrifice Biff escapes a vicious circle of greed and self-delusion; he is freed. Accordingly, the audience experiences a catharsis—the cleansing or purgation associated with classical tragedy. The play’s final lesson, then, is that destiny lies in discovering one’s true identity, in following one’s bliss, and in being true to one’s inmost and honest self.

Death of a Salesman

Death of a Salesman is play written by Arthur Miller. The author through this work has received many awards such as Pulitzer Prize in 1949. The play was written during the postwar era in the United States of America. It was meant to give hope and inspiration to the middle class people in the society. The play gives more emphasis on the values of material success and the philosophy of the American people. There is a reflection of anxiety and insecurity in the play which expresses the past experience of the author. Miller was a Jewish born in the New York City in 1915. Since he was a Jewish, Miller encountered a lot of challenges such as social disintegration during the 1930s Great Depression. Miller through his tough life experienced a lot of depression and gave him the drive to achieve in life. Taking on odd jobs such as truck driver and factory worker gave him an opportunity to directly interact with those who suffer the most. Miller expressed these experiences through the Death of a Salesman play which was performed in 1949.

The play had several characters such as Willy Loman, Linda, Happy among others. The play takes in the house and yard of Willy Loman and other places in New York in the Boston area.

The key theme of the play is about the American Dream since America has been referred to as land of opportunities for long. America has been known to be a land where anyone can make it and be successful. This is why many migrants struggle to enter into America through illegal channels because they are sure they will succeed.

This play revolves around the life of Willy Loma as he desperately chases the dream of success. The play displays the reality of things in America and the illusions that many Americans have in their lives through the American Dream. Miller demonstrates the importance of time in the process of achieving the dream in Loman’s life while on stage. There is a relationship between the present and the past in Willy’s mind reflection. The act also describes the changes in the environment especially the neighborhood of Willy. Willy was a salesman who had over 30 years worked as salesman in New England coast. Act one tells us that Willy is at home and Linda is very concerned about this. This shows how people were insecure whenever one does not have a job. Willy is also worried about making ends meet. Although he does not have a lot of burden since his son is independent and the house is nearly paid for.

The death of a salesman tells us about the struggle that was taking place in 1949. How people struggled to put food on the table and strive to achieve the American Dream of being stable and successful. Although there was a controversy that this play was against the capitalists, it is a good play that earned the author a good name as writer during post war era in America.

0 Thoughts to “Example Essays On Death Of A Salesman

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *